Brazil

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blindpig
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Re: Brazil

Post by blindpig » Fri Oct 25, 2019 3:31 pm

Save our Shores: The Oil Disaster in Brazil’s North East
ENERGY ENVIRONMENT NORTH EAST
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By Nate Allen.

“This is the biggest (marine) environmental disaster in the history of Brazil, if we consider the length of the coastline that has been affected”, said biologist Flavio Lima. Brazil’s Northeast 2,000 km shoreline has been splattered with oil, from large swathes to millions of tiny blobs that are the size of a pebble. Scientists estimate it will take decades to recuperate. And yet for over a month, deliberate inaction was the response by Bolsonaro. If the Northeast receives 20,000+ soldiers/workers with additional little shovels & dust pans for the local population, it can greatly reduce the long-term negative impact on species and communities. Immediate international pressure is once again needed on Brazil’s federal government to quicken up this slow cleanup.

On the riverbanks and the edges of the mangroves, time is simply running out to pick up much of this oil. As biologist Francisco Kelmo stated, “The first step is removing this oil as fast as possible. The faster we remove it, the easier the recuperation process.” Oil removal from rivers, mangroves, and corals should be top priority.

I live in Sergipe, the state at the center of the oil spill that has hit all nine Northeast states in Brazil. Over the past few weeks, I’ve been scoping out the oil debris on the beaches, rivers, and mangroves nearby. Unfortunately, due to the mass amount of oil and inaction by Bolsonaro, most of this oil has been sitting out for weeks. On the beaches, millions of pebble-like oil debris is drying out and breaking apart into even smaller pieces, becoming a permanent part of the same sand where our families make castles. In the riverbanks and mangroves, the oil is fading quickly into rocks and disappearing within the mud. What especially complicates the cleanup of riverbanks and mangroves is the often less than two-hour period to access them during low tide. We need to delicately remove as much of this oil debris as fast as humanly possible. Machines won’t work in most places. Humans with small shovels will.

The first state hit by the offshore oil spill was Paraíba on August 30th. The second was Pernambuco on September 2nd. Despite a second attack, Bolsonaro did not mention it or attempt to act to prevent and minimize the oil spill. As his silence in September rolled on to October, so did the oil onto the beaches of all nine Northeast states. Beyond the ecological damage, the public health concerns of this oil spill on beachgoers were obvious, especially on children. Yet no words or action came out from Brazil’s capital. Brazil went from an August of Amazon Fires Raging to a September Silence on a Northeast Oil Spill.

Bolsonaro’s silence was finally broken on October 5th, a day after a giant oil patch hit here in Aracaju, Sergipe. The oil spill was now too big to ignore. He finally publicly addressed the spill and opened an investigation, led by the Marines & Federal Police. Since then, he has almost exclusively focused on blaming Venezuela for the spill and given near zero attention on prevention (e.g. water barriers) and cleanup (soldiers/workers), only releasing a few thousand soldiers/workers to help out. Over the past two months, most of the cleanup has been done by volunteers, municipalities, and states.

Bolsonaro later stated that he knew of the spill since September 2nd, yet he chose to stay silent on it for an entire month. He also said he had received confidential chemical analysis by the Navy and Petrobras of the oil showing it had Venezuela’s “signature”. When did he find this “signature” info out? I ask because he seems to care far more about blaming Venezuela than preventing and cleaning up. It’s almost as if he wants more damage done to the Northeast so that he can use it as ammunition against Venezuela. Maybe he thinks it might end up helping his political idol win in Florida.

Bolsonaro has also had a longstanding open war with the Northeast. The Northeast was the only region that voted against him, and by a huge ratio of 2-1. Here in Sergipe, he lost in every one of the 75 municipalities. During the past week, I’ve heard many say that if this oil spill came to the south (e.g. Copacabana, Ipanema, Buzios, etc.), the federal government and military would be on the shores immediately picking it up.

U.S. oil sanctions on Venezuela might be partly responsible for this oil spill, though Bolsonaro is trying to spin it the other way around. U.S. sanctions on Venezuela and Iran are leading to many oil transporters turning off their signal when transporting their oil from those locations in order to avoid being tracked by U.S. satellites. These ships are called “ghost ships” or “dark ships”. Russia usually ships Venezuela’s oil, but Southeast Asian countries also are among the only other countries in the world that still buy Venezuelan oil, despite the U.S. sanctions. One hypothesis, which was also mentioned by Brazil’s environmental minister, is that this spill might have come from a Bangladesh ghost ship delivering oil from Venezuela to Asia, when in the South Atlantic it either sunk or was involved in a leaky ship-to-ship oil transfer. This hypothesis is based on the fact that two barrels recently showed up on the shore of Sergipe on October 11th. The Hindi word “Ekata” was written on them. “Ekata” is also the name of a decommissioned ship, whose last position was in Bangladesh in 2017. These barrels also had a lubricant label manufactured by Shell, although an analysis by Federal University of Sergipe showed it had the same oil that was found on the beach, not the lubricant marked on the label. Even if this Asian Ghost Ship Hypothesis turns out correct, then U.S. sanctions may have played a role, as that ship might have gone through the Panama Canal instead.

As Bolsonaro was busy blaming Venezuela yet completely ignoring the cleanup, questions were raised on why he wasn’t implementing the National Oil Spill Contingency Plan (English summary here), which was established in 2013. It outlines strategies, responsibilities, actions, locations, etc. for an oil spill. This plan is especially important as Brazil’s oil & gas offshore fields account for 94% of its total production (95% oil & 80% gas) from nearly 700 offshore fields. We now know why Bolsonaro was ignoring the plan. Last April, he apparently dismantled the committee in charge of implementing the plan! By the way, Bolsonaro is currently expanding offshore drilling into more controversial areas that have a higher risk of spill, making such a plan and committee that more vital.

A month late and without a plan or committee, what was Bolsonaro’s response for an oil spill that spanned 2,000 km and nine states? He only sent 1,583 soldiers to help, less than 0.5% of ~350,000 active. The state-owned oil company Petrobras provided 1,700 environmental agents. To put this help in perspective, the state of Sergipe alone needs that number of extra workers. Since I live in Sergipe, I’ll share what we’ve been through, as each state has their own unique challenges with this oil spill.


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Aracaju (Oct. 25). Nate Allen.

In late September, Sergipe started getting oil, but it wasn’t until October 4th when it started to get out of control. Two days later, Sergipe declared a state of emergency. All of the state’s beaches had gotten badly hit by oil. It was nearly impossible to walk on most of the beaches without stepping on oil. There were millions of little oil blobs the size of pebbles.

There was also a huge fear in Sergipe that the oil would move into the mouth of the rivers and mangroves as well. During high tide, the salt water from the ocean often reverses the water flow at the mouth and ocean water overflows into the surrounding mangroves. This high tide brings the oil into the mouth of the river where it can potentially devastate the unique ecosystems and economies that depend heavily on fish and seafood, especially crabs. Sergipe’s famous tourist attraction is a giant crab statue.

The day after Sergipe declared a state of emergency, Brazil’s environmental minister came here to see it firsthand. Many assumed that after he left, he would send massive amount of resources and workers to the state. Yet a week later, Sergipe had received little help from the federal government, with less than 100 federal workers sent. It barely made a dent. The environmental minister was also denying Sergipe buoys (water barriers), despite our state being highly dependent on many rivers which empty out into the Atlantic, including the big São Francisco.

To the north, the São Francisco River makes up Sergipe’s border with Alagoas. Unfortunately, the mouth of the São Francisco River has already been contaminated with oil debris. The horror was reported in BBC News Brasil article, “Arrival of oil threatens fauna, flora and sustenance of families at the mouth of the São Francisco River.” Even though the article is in Portuguese, the images get the message across. One of the local merchants said, “The oil debris has turned into a thick paste, descending to bottom where it becomes invisible. That is, it’s sinking”. This sinking oil is exactly what Sergipe had been fearing.

The amount of oil debris sinking in the mouth of São Francisco could have been diminished. It wasn’t until last week (Oct. 14) when the federal government finally decided to increase the amount of water released from the huge upstream reservoir that passes down the hydroelectric dam Xingu (800 to 1300 m³/s). This extra water flow lessens the amount of oil debris entering the river’s mouth. Actions like this that could’ve been taken a month ago, but are just now being undertaken. I’ve taken the ferry across the mouth of the São Francisco, between Piaçabuçu (Alagoas) and Brejo Grande (Sergipe). It is breathtaking. It is also home to the Quilombo of Brejão dos Negros. To think that these communities and this ecological treasure could be permanently contaminated with oil is heartbreaking.

To the south, just down from the Sergipe-Bahia border, the Itapicuru River had already been contaminated with oil debris. In the town of Conde where the Itapicuru River meets the Atlantic, Brazil’s oil company Petrobras had earlier trained forty residents earlier on managing the buoys. Yet a week went by, but no buoys arrived by the time it got contaminated. The rivers in this region of Brazil are beloved by many of its citizens, as it is a source of nourishment for the tummy as well as the soul. In fact, just a few months ago, I helped spread the ashes of my late father-in-law in the Itapicuru River. It is where he had requested his remains to flow when he died. The rivers are a sacred place to many.

Since oil had already entered in the rivers to both the north and south of Sergipe, we were desperately trying to get more buoys for our other major rivers. Yet the federal environmental minister was denying us buoys. His excuse was that the buoys available were designed to stop thinner oil, not the thicker oil which we were receiving that tends to drift near the bottom. Yet the director of Sergipe’s environmental agency responded, “We’ve seen results from the buoys we’ve already put in. We know that they won’t guarantee 100%, but they can considerably decrease the amount of oil debris in sensitive areas.”

We were being blocked by our own federal environmental minister in receiving buoys that could help block some of the oil! But Sergipe didn’t back down. A federal prosecutor in Sergipe sued the federal government for more buoys, and a federal judge in Sergipe gave the federal government a 48-hour deadline to deliver the buoys, or else they would get fined daily. The lawsuit woke up the nation to the inaction by the federal government. The smallest state had just charged straight at the federal government. This lawsuit also encouraged other Northeastern states to sue the federal government too.

With his back against the wall, the environmental minister finally released more buoys. The next day, one of the buoys was pulled away by the strong currents. Yet instead of finding solutions to help the state hold these barriers in place, the environmental minister went to twitter to make fun of Sergipe for losing it. Yes, in the middle of an environmental catastrophe, our environmental minster mocks us while attempting to hold back resources. This same minister is now alluding to Greenpeace being the potential source for the oil spill. I can’t imagine there is a more sinister environmental minister on the planet.

Unfortunately, the buoys came too late and the oil already made its way up most of the rivers and into the mangroves. To be clear, oil would have likely reached the mangroves with the extra buoys, but likely a lot less. Oil has moved kilometers upstream through a primary tributary (Poxim River) onto the riverbanks of a city park (Parque dos Cajueiros). This means kilometers of mangroves have already been contaminated. This is a tragedy. We need people cleaning up this oil around the edges of the mangroves (and where possible inside), before this oil becomes further integrated into the mud of the mangroves. I’ve already noticed the changes in just one week. Before, much of the oil on the riverbanks and mangrove edges stuck out with shiny liquid which reflected brightly the sunlight. Whereas now, much of this same oil debris is hard to see as it is becoming darker and sinking deeper into the mud. Every day that this oil is allowed to remain on the shore, the harder it becomes to find.

Speaking of hard to find – President Bolsonaro has yet to visit the greatest marine catastrophe in Brazil’s history. Super Minister Moro, who oversees the Federal Police investigating the spill, has also not visited. Instead, Bolsonaro and Moro traveled last week to the south of the Brazil, where they played around with their favorite toy. They shot guns in a new rifle training center.

Bolsonaro then left the country to start his overseas trip, which he is currently on. His absence makes the vice president the acting president. What did the acting president do in his first 48 hours with the new powers he had? He activated 5,000 Army soldiers to help clean up the shores! Although this additional 5,000 is far short of the 20,000+ soldiers/workers likely needed in the Northeast, it is double what Bolsonaro did in two months.

Bolsonaro’s no-to-slow response to this oil spill is identical to the Amazon fires. On August 10th, the infamous “Day of Fire” started the intentional setting fires to show support for Bolsonaro’s agricultural agenda. Two weeks later he said, “Forty men to fight a fire? There aren’t the resources. This chaos has arrived.” Two days later, after an intense international cry and threats of boycotts over his deliberate inaction, he sent over 40,000 soldiers to fight the fires, which was 1,000 times more than what was previously unaffordable. This costal oil spill in the Northeast is in need of similar help – tens of thousands of soldiers/workers with small shovels as well as extra shovels and supplies for local volunteers.

Please put more pressure on Brazil’s federal government to help clean up the oil spill in the Northeast before more of it becomes permanently stuck in our shores, which kills marine animals like turtles and crabs as well as risks the water we drink and swim in, and contaminates the sand we make castles out of.

http://www.brasilwire.com/save-our-shor ... orth-east/
"We ask no compassion from you. When our turn comes, we shall not make excuses for the terror."

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Re: Brazil

Post by blindpig » Fri Nov 01, 2019 6:00 pm

Satellite imagery reveals 330km2 Oil Slick off Bahia coast
ENVIRONMENT NORTH EAST SCIENCE
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Scientist says slick appears to be from drilling accident. Bolsonaro administration ignores data, tries to blame Venezuela

On October 30th, two days before Brazilian Federal police moved to investigate a Greek oil tanker for the oil spill which has poisoned over 2000 km of Brazilian coastline, researchers at the Federal University of Alagoas published satellite images showing a 55×6 km, half-moon shaped oil slick, 54km off of the coast of Southern Bahia. In it’s zeal to blame Venezuela for the environmental disaster, the Brazilian federal police have ignored the information. Despite evidence to the contrary, the Brazilian government is still insisting that one tanker is responsible for the problem.

After weeks of analyzing satellite imagery, Humberto Barbosa, from Alagoas Federal University’s Laboratório de Análise e Processamento de Imagens de Satélites (Satellite Imagry Processing and Analysis Laboratory/Lapis ) announced the findings. “The imagery shows that the origin of the spill could be below the ocean surface. With this, we raise the hypothesis that the pollution could be caused by a huge leak in a petroleum drilling operation. Due to the location of the slick, it could have even originally taken place in the Pre-salt region.”

Barbosa explained that, due to the location of the oil and the size of the slick, it had to be caused by something much greater than a leaky oil tanker. “The leak is taking place at the ocean floor, as a consequence of drilling,” he said.

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro has been criticized by environmentalists for failing to respond to the disaster, which is damaging tourism in the Brazilian northeast, a region in which he lost the presidential election by a 2–1 margin. Although the disaster began in August, he failed to mention it publicly until October 5th, and then, only to blame the incident on Venezuela.


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Many of the volunteers cleaning oil from the Northeastern beaches are getting sick

Shortly after taking office in January, President Bolsonaro dismantled the national contingency plan for oil spills, which had been established by the Dilma Rousseff administration in 2013. The government provided no assistance for weeks after the spill was discovered. Instead, thousands of volunteers began manually removing the oil from 283 beaches. Many of the volunteers have been complaining of headaches, nausea and diarrhea.

The oil is currently drifting towards Abrolhos National Marine Reserve, which is home to some of the Brazil’s largest coral reefs and is a breeding ground for Humpback Whale.

http://www.brasilwire.com/satellite-ima ... hia-coast/
"We ask no compassion from you. When our turn comes, we shall not make excuses for the terror."

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Re: Brazil

Post by blindpig » Mon Nov 04, 2019 12:12 pm

Guajajara leader killed in Maranhão
November 3, 2019

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Paulino was murdered inside indigenous land; “Bolsonaro government has indigenous blood on its hands,” says APIB

Brazil of Fact | Sao Paulo-SP)

Paulo Paulino was part of a group of indigenous forest agents known as “Guardians of the Forest” / Sarah Shenker / Survival International / Reproduction
The indigenous Paulo Paulino Guajajara was murdered by loggers last Friday (1) in the region of Bom Jesus das Selvas, in the Maranhão. Paulo, who was also known as the “Big Bad Wolf”, was part of a group of indigenous forest agents known as the “Forest Guardians”.

According to information from the entities, the group was allegedly ambushed within its own territory, between Lagoa Comprida and Jenipapo villages, in the Araribóia Indigenous Land. Paul was reportedly shot dead in the face after "intense confrontation." Paulino's body was said to have remained at the place of his death for a long time because of the impossibility of being removed due to the situation of violence against indigenous people in the area.

Another guardian, Laércio Guajajara, was injured and is hospitalized in stable condition. One of the loggers who carried out the ambush would also have been killed - the body is still missing. The National Indian Foundation (Funai) and the Maranhão Public Security Secretariat sent agents to the place.

Guardians Paulino and Laercio had drifted away from the village to fetch water when they were surrounded by at least 5 gunmen, who had initially fired two shots at the Indians, according to one witness.

In a statement, the Brazilian Indigenous Peoples Association (APIB) stated that the case confirms that “the Bolsonaro government has indigenous blood on its hands, the increased violence in indigenous territories is a direct reflection of its hate speech and measures against indigenous peoples of Brazil ”.

"Our lands are being invaded, our leaders murdered, attacked and criminalized and the Brazilian State is leaving the abandoned people to all sorts of luck with the ongoing dismantling of environmental and indigenous policies," the text continues.

“We no longer want to be statistics, we want measures from the Government, the bodies that are increasingly scrapped precisely not to protect the people who are paying with their lives for doing the work that is the responsibility of the state. We demand urgent justice! ”Declared the indigenous leader Sônia Guajajara.

Soon more information.

Edition: Rafael Tatemoto

https://pcb.org.br/portal2/24234/lider- ... -maranhao/

Google Translator
"We ask no compassion from you. When our turn comes, we shall not make excuses for the terror."

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Re: Brazil

Post by blindpig » Tue Nov 05, 2019 5:45 pm

Disaster: Brazilian government can’t find oil spill source
AUTHORITARIANISM ENVIRONMENT NORTH EAST
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2 months into the largest spill in Brazilian history, after gutting environmental protection agencies and silencing scientific research institutes, the government can’t figure out where the oil is coming from. With 2100 km of beaches already poisoned, far right President Bolsonaro says, “the worst is yet to come.”

First he blamed the communists. Why not? As fans of Jordan Peterson and Steve Bannon, right wing extremist President Jair Bolsonaro and his corrupt sidekick Sérgio Moro love the resuscitated Nazi-trope of cultural Marxism, which provides a handy tool to label all political enemies as communists. Weeks after the oil started arriving on Northeastern Brazilian beaches, before the government had even begun any serious effort to contain the spill, Sérgio Moro’s federal police found a culprit: Venezuela. It was, they said, a Greek tanker hauling oil from “communist” Venezuela that has just destroyed the tourism and fishing industries in the Brazilian northeast. However, at the same time they announced that the alleged culprit, a tanker called the Bouboulina registered with Delta Tankers Ltd, had a shipping capacity of 1 million barrels, the Federal Police estimated the total size of the spill at 2.5 million barrels. Despite the saber rattling against Venezuela, by their own admission, the Bouboulina could not have been the main culprit in the spill. To further discredit the Sérgio Moro’s federal police, Delta Tankers proved that the Bouboulina arrived in port in Malasia and unloaded 1 million barrels of petroleum on schedule, and that there was no evidence, satellite based or otherwise, that the ship had, “stopped, conducted any kind of ship-to-ship operation, leaked, slowed down or veered off course, on its passage from Venezuela to Melaka, Malaysia.”

Two months into what may turn out to be the worst environmental disaster in Brazilian history, as Bolsonaro finally starts sending the Navy in to try to contain the spill the government’s only theory, the ideologically motivated story that Venezuela caused it has crumbled.

Silencing the scientists

Not only has the Bolsonaro government, which has a Trump-like mistrust of Science, systematically ignored all of the satellite data, it’s given a gag order to scientists. As the oil leak spun out of control, scientists in the National Space Research Institute (INPE) were ordered not to make any public statements about the disaster, because “it would make the government look like the bad guy.”

Nevertheless, researchers in the INPE (whose director Bolsonaro fired earlier this year for warning that fires were burning out of control in the Amazon) and the Satellite Imagery Processing and Analysis Laboratory of Alagoas Federal University (LAPIS) have warned that evidence points to multiple origins, including a possible a drilling accident, possibly caused by one of the many foreign companies that have benefited by the post 2016 coup “price of bananas” oil reserve auctions, none of which have Petrobras’ technical know-how in deep water drilling operations. If this turns out to be the case, the oil is still coming and Brazil should brace for the worst. Recent statements by Bolsonaro himself, uttered between paranoid rants nervously denying he had anything to do with the murder of Rio de Janeiro city councilwoman Marielle Franco, uphold this thesis. “The worst is yet to come,” he said during an interview on Sunday night to the evangelical christian television network, Record.

According to the Brazilian Petroleum Workers Union Federation (FUP), the Federal Government has not only been ignoring scientists, its been lying to the public about the effects of the oil spill. Tourism Minister Marcelo Álvaro Antônio and Vice President Hamilton Mourão have both announced that the oil poses no risk to bathers, but scientists say otherwise. Legions of volunteers who, in the absence of a coherent government response to the spill have been cleaning oil on their own, are complaining of nausea, diarrhea and migraines, and 17 have been hospitalized. According to the FUP, the quality of information given to the Brazilian public on the oil spill is so bad that it has had to rely on conflicting information in the media.

Among the largest beneficiaries of the privatization of Brazil’s offshore oil fields are: Shell, Exxon Mobil, BP, Chevron and the Chinese company CNOOC.

http://www.brasilwire.com/disaster-braz ... ll-source/
"We ask no compassion from you. When our turn comes, we shall not make excuses for the terror."

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Re: Brazil

Post by blindpig » Fri Nov 08, 2019 12:21 pm

Ruling paves way for Lula’s freedom: People’s movement in Brazil scores major victory
By Silvio RodriguesNov 07, 2019

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Lula's supporters, including PSL members, at a demonstration demanding his freedom outside the Brazilian consulate in Los Angeles. Photo: Ben Huff.

With the latest ruling from the Brazilian Supreme Federal Tribunal, Former Brazilian President Luís Inácio Lula da Silva should soon be set free.

In a 6-to-5 vote, Brazil’s highest court has reversed its position allowing imprisonment after a conviction following a first appeal. The decision means those convicted of non-violent crimes cannot be imprisoned until all their appeals are exhausted. Lula falls squarely within this category.

This ruling by the country’s highest court should not have been controversial. The Brazilian Constitution of 1988 unambiguously states that one cannot be imprisoned until all appeals are exhausted. The Brazilian Order of Attorneys, which represents lawyers over the entire country, has advocated for no imprisonment until the exhaustion of appeals, as have several other organizations representing Brazilian lawyers.

What is the real issue?

The controversy was not legal, but political. Tossing aside the constitution, the Supreme Federal Tribunal affirmed its support for imprisonment before exhaustion of appeals in February 2016. This was at the height of Car Wash operation that sought to crush the Worker’s Party and, more broadly, the entire Brazilian left. The impeachment of President Dilma Rousseff of the Workers Party unfolded in the background. The Brazilian right wing that would eventually bring Bolsonaro to power was emboldened, mobilized and on the rise.

The Car Wash operation yielded great power by combining early imprisonment with “delação premiada”, a legal provision for awarding sentence reductions to defendants who incriminate other individuals. The threat of imprisonment before exhausting appeals gave a much stronger incentive for defendants to tell investigators whatever they wanted to hear — be it truthful or not — in order to save their own neck.

These “legal instruments” put the Car Wash operation on par with the Spanish Inquisition. Accusations squeezed from defendants and convicted individuals took center stage while an unquestioning corporate media whipped up public discontent and support for new convictions even when material evidence was lacking or absent.

These legal tactics provided the basis for convicting Lula without proof and sending him to prison, removing him from the presidential race which he was nearly certain to win and paving the way for a Bolsonaro victory.

Ruling on Lula’s freedom a victory for the people’s movement

The shift in the Supreme Federal Tribunal’s latest ruling is not accidental. It comes amid a changing political tide in Brazil.

The reputation of the Car Wash operation was dealt a severe blow by The Intercept’s publication of messages exchanged between Judge Sérgio Moro and leading Car Wash prosecutor Deltan Dallagnol. The messages showed that Car Wash prosecutors were deeply concerned with preventing a victory for the Workers’ Party in the 2018 presidential elections. Worse yet, they revealed Moro worked hand-in-hand with prosecutors to help them build the case against Lula rather than functioning as an impartial arbiter. Moro is now the Minister of Justice in Brazil, rewarded by Bolsonaro for making his electoral victory possible.

While the Car Wash operation unravels, the Free Lula campaign has mobilized worldwide support. In Brazil, left and progressive forces from a broad array of political parties and organizations have joined hands in demanding freedom for Lula. At its core, the campaign is a repudiation of the abuse of Brazil’s legal system for political ends. In a country where the memory of military dictatorship is still alive, the call for Lula’s freedom is a defense of the right of Brazilians to choose their own leaders via democratic means.

Despite great pressure from military generals, congressional representatives, and ardent supporters of Bolsonaro from Brazil’s extreme right targeting the Supreme Federal Tribunal, the new correlation of forces caused the scale to tilt on the side of justice. The Supreme Federal Tribunal’s ruling does not exonerate Lula, but should result in his release while his appeals are pending.

Lula’s freedom will be an immense victory for the Brazilian left and an unprecedented defeat for the Car Wash operation whose legal power has been largely unchecked up until now. It comes at a moment when the reactionary Bolsonaro government is struggling to keep its footing. Coming on the heels of progressive popular uprisings in Chile and Ecuador, it stands to bring new energy into the mass popular movements of Brazil and Latin America.

https://www.liberationnews.org/ruling-p ... rationnews
"We ask no compassion from you. When our turn comes, we shall not make excuses for the terror."

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